A Rubb Arctic adventure on the move…

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The Rubb structure built on the ice cap in Greenland for the National Science Foundation has taken a sled ride to a different location.

As previously referenced, the Rubb BVR storage facility, known as the Summit Mobile Garage, is a 32’ x 97’ heavily insulated building designed and engineered to be moved or, more aptly, moved by sled from place to place. Due to massive amounts of drifting snow it is easier to tow the building to a new resting spot rather than remove the piles of snow.

In the pictures above, the site crew is shown towing and pivoting the building to its new temporary location. According to Marc Boutet, who spent a month in Greenland as technical advisor: “The guys told me they waited for a warm, balmy day and dragged the building to a spot less likely to get buried with drifting snow… warm and balmy means a few degrees above zero,” Marc added with a chuckle.

Actually the Rubb building was moved about 400 yards and the crew at Summit Station reported no problems with the move. “That’s because we designed and built it right,” concluded Marc.

For more information on this project or on any other high quality Rubb products go to www.rubbusa.com

A Rubb Arctic adventure

“What an experience!” were the first words spoken by long time Rubb USA site supervisor and current salesman Marc Boutet after spending nearly a month overseeing the erection of a Rubb BVR on the polar ice cap.

Rubb USA has completed a 32’ x 97’ BVR structure at Summit Station CH2M Polar Hill Services, in Greenland, for the National Science Foundation.

Located at 72° 36′ N latitude, and at an altitude of 10,600 feet with a mean annual air temperature of -31°, Summit Station has long challenged the physical fitness of its visitors.

In the spirit of “a picture is worth a thousand words” we can reveal a handful of recently taken photos related to the project and provide some interesting insight.

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C-130: Shipping and Receiving

The Rubb building was neatly packed and delivered via a USAF C-130 equipped with skis to land on the ice cap. The interior of the plane was ‘tight quarters’ as you can see in the picture below. That is the Rubb building to the left.

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Free refrigeration

Food and supplies are stored ‘undersnow’ in a dug out cavern. Due to snowfall the depth of the cavern increases significantly over time to the point where the crew will dig a new ‘refrigerator’. From the photo below you can see the crew moving supplies into the cavern.

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Not your average Ritz-Carlton

Sleeping arrangements at Summit Station… room service?

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Building under construction:

The work begins…

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With building framework complete, the gable end is lifted into position.

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The Thermohall PVC ‘sheets’ are pulled/adjusted onto the frame via snowmobile.

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The cladding on this building is R-35 rated Thermohall with 8” of high density insulation, after all the temperature can reach -100F! Rubb Thermohall is designed to withstand and perform in the harshest of environments.

Interior of building:

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The BVR will be equipped with a generator driven lighting and heating system. The structure will support operations at Summit Station and will primarily serve as an equipment and maintenance shed. The building is set upon a foundation of wood/metal that can be best described as an ‘oversized toboggan’. Thus the structure can be moved periodically to prevent being ‘snowed over’. Rubb innovation at its best!

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When asked what was most interesting experience about the Greenland project, Marc smiled and immediately said departing the site on a C-130. “The runway, actually ‘snowway’ is over three miles long and lined mostly with black flags. When you see red flags the plane must stop and turn around and try to take off again in the opposite direction. This is at nearly 11,000 ft. and the snow creates a lot of friction. After three failed attempts to lift off we stopped and the land crew attached portable ‘rockets’ to the plane to help us gain enough speed to gain altitude. I heard a couple of ‘booms’ and up in the air we went! All I could think was… what is going on? Well, I made it!”

More Rubb adventures to follow!

Total Warriors step up to the challenge for charity

Rubb Managing Director Ian Hindmoor and his wife Joanne lost someone very dear to them earlier this year. Jill Reed, a very close friend of Joanne’s, sadly passed away from breast cancer at the age of 36. Jill (pictured below right with Joanne) leaves behind a loving husband Mark, daughter Connie and son Luke. Now Ian and Joanne are taking on the Total Warrior challenge on June 28th to raise money for Breakthrough Breast Cancer.

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Total Warrior is the pinnacle of obstacle racing, providing the most innovative and highest quality obstacle event in the UK. With around 30 punishing challenges provided over a 12.5KM all terrain course, Total Warrior also offers greater variety and more obstacles-per-kilometre than any other race. The Hindmoors have both been in training and Ian will be updating the Rubb blog with all their latest efforts in the run up to the event. Read all about it in his first post below…

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There are now only 15 days to go until the Total Warrior Challenge.

Training needs to step up over the next two weeks to ensure we are both ready for this challenge. Mentally I feel prepared, I have only one main concern, that is making sure I don’t get stuck in any confined spaces that may happen to be part of the obstacle course.
Physically my fitness is okay, not brilliant, but I feel as though I have enough to get round the course.
Some online research (YouTube videos) have given me that extra buzz of excitement, and dread. From what I have seen there are not too many confined spaces to worry about but some rather tricky looking high walls to jump over!

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Last week’s training with Transform Fitness has involved:
Friday Morning 3.2Km
Friday Night Bootcamp
Saturday AM Warrior Training at The Barn, cross country running and obstacles
Sunday Morning Strength Session at The Barn
Monday Morning 3.2km
Monday Night Bootcamp
Tuesday Morning PT, Harness Runs with a tyre up hill, cardio and upper body strength work
Wednesday Morning 5km run
Wednesday Night Bootcamp
Thursday morning PT focusing on weights (upperbody and leg strength) and cardio work (boxing)
Thursday Night “Warrior Run”. This is a 5.5 mile cross country/all-terain evening run that I have been doing every Thursday as part of a group from Transform Fitness. It’s really hard work, loads of hills, steep steep hills and the dreaded “steps of doom” (222 steps)!

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My diet is not as clean or heathy as it once was, or what I need it to be, so that is my focus over the next 2 weeks, better diet and push hard on the training. That way I’m sure I will be ready for the challenge. Bring it on!

We would be very grateful if you can contribute to this cause, which is very close to our hearts.

To make a donation please visit Ian’s JustGiving page

Donating through JustGiving is simple, fast and totally secure. Your details are safe with JustGiving – they’ll never sell them on or send unwanted emails. Once you donate, they’ll send your money directly to the charity. So it’s the most efficient way to donate – saving time and cutting costs for the charity.

To read the full story please visit www.rubbuk.com

Rubb lands at IDEX

Rubb Managing Director Ian Hindmoor (pictured below right) and Sales Manager Andy Knox gear up for IDEX 2015. Andy returns to the Rubb Blog with all the latest news from the show in Abu Dhabi…

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Setting up – An early start
We checked into the hotel at 4am on Saturday and then we were up and out again at 8am to go and collect our passes and set up ready for the opening day. The stand showcasing our military buildings looked good (Hall 06 – Stand A38). Once we had checked everything over and delivered our brochures to the appropriate parties we were done ready for the show to start.
We could not have picked a better hotel. The Novotel Al Bustan is clean, friendly, comfortable and perfectly located, just a five minute taxi ride to and from the exhibition centre. The plan was simple, gym, food, beer whilst watching the match and then bed (we won’t discuss the match).

Day 1 – Don’t look down!
We arrived at the exhibition nice and early on Sunday to get a pre-show walk around and get our bearings. The morning was a little quiet but the opening ceremony was very entertaining and by the afternoon the familiar buzz of chatter was in the air and the show was starting to gather some speed.
Amongst the delegates there was a stand-out person of interest that had to be approached. James Kingston, professional adventurer from Channel 4’s Don’t Look Down documentary was more than accommodating when approached for a quick business selfie. James (pictured below left with Rubb MD Ian Hindmoor) had been scaling the roof tops of Dubai just the day before – feel free to take a look at his latest daredevil antics at https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=ceqxF6AxZzM
James Kingston at IDEX
Before we knew it the day was done and it was time for a quick shower and turn around for a reception hosted by Ambassador Philip Parham CMG at the British Embassy. As always this was a first class networking event allowing us to spread the Rubb name.

Day 2 – A busy day ahead
A 7am gym session kicked Day 2 off with a bang, followed by breakfast and a taxi to the show. Straight away it was evident that Day 2 was going to be busier than the opening day – the queue for security was nearly out the door and it wasn’t even opening hours.
A quick catch up with emails and the office back home was quickly interrupted by two visits of interest and a familiar face which is always nice, the day was panning out nicely…..

Upcoming Trade Shows for 2014

We are pleased to announce our calendar of trade shows for the remainder of 2014! Stop by our booths to take a look at PVC samples and brochures, sign up for our newsletter, and speak to some of our sales team members about how fabric buildings can fit your needs. And before visiting Rubb Building Systems make sure to add us on our social media pages – Facebook, Twitter, Google+, and Linkedin – #excellenceinengineering

breakbulk_americas_2012_bulkinsideBreakbulk Americas 2014 is the largest exhibition & educational forum in the Americas addressing the needs of traditional breakbulk and project cargo logistics professionals. Breakbulk Americas’ targeted programming will ensure that you develop skills and strategy to help you do your job more effectively. The exhibition will be held on September 29th to October 2nd at the George R. Brown Convention Center (Exhibit Hall E) in Houston, Texas. Rubb Building Systems will be set up in booth 518, and don’t forget to RSVP on our event page for a copy of the official floor plan, a link to the Breakbulk Americas 2014 Mobile App, and daily updates from our booth during the show.

Entete_ENXplor 2014, an event organized by the Association of Exploration and Mining Quebec (AEMQ), is a convention that brings together investors, prospectors, geologists, and service providers who contribute to the development of Quebec’s mining industry. In addition to the trade show, this event offers a program of high-level learning, a conference dinner with renowned speakers, and several social activities promoting business networking. The event will be held on October 22nd to the 23rd at Place Bonaventure in Downtown Montreal, Quebec, CANADA. Rubb Building Systems, along with our partners Aztec Group, will be in booth 504, and don’t forget to RSVP on our event page for a copy of the official floor plan and daily updates from our booth during the show.

canadian_waste_and_recycling_expo_2013The Canadian Waste and Recycling Expo is the premier event in Canada for waste and recycling professionals representing a variety of different sectors, including waste collection, hauling, disposal, storage, and much more. This expo also includes a host of networking events and is co-located with the Canadian Waste to Resource Conference which offers and excellent educational form on the latest innovative developments within the industry. The event will be held on November 19th to the 20th at the International Centre in Mississauga, Ontario, CANADA. Rubb Building Systems, along with our partners Aztec Group, will be in booth 1410, and don’t forget to RSVP on our event page for a copy of the official floor plan, a link to the Canadian Waste and Recycling Expo Mobile App, and daily updates from our booth during the show.

PGIThroughout the years, POWER-GEN International has covered it all, providing a world stage for the innovations, ideas and solutions that have formed our industry for more than two decades.  POWER-GEN International is the industry’s premier platform for numerous new product launches and unveilings—a showcase for products and services such as boilers, turbines, engines, boiler water and feedwater treatment services, computer hardware and software, controls and instrumentation systems, engineering and construction services, generators, plant electrical systems, pumps, valves and valve actuators, and more. The event will be held on December 9th to the 11th at the Orange County Convention Center (West Halls) in Orlando, Florida. Rubb Building Systems will be set up in booth 830, and don’t forget to RSVP on our event page for a copy of the official floor plan and daily updates from our booth during the show.

Ask the Engineer: Occupancy Categories

Ask the Engineer is a blog segment presented by the engineering department at Rubb Building Systems. Our goal is to help Rubb customers to understand the world of structure engineering in a way that is free of jargon and easy to comprehend. We hope to educate, advise, and consult on best practices and why proper engineering is crucial to project safety and cost over the long term.

What is an “Occupancy Category”?

Occupancy category is defined as the purpose for which a building or other structure, or part thereof, is used or intended to be used. “It essentially breaks down to how many people are inside, whether it’s temporary or permanent, and the function of the building,” our engineer explained. There are four occupancy categories, each determined by the nature of the occupancy which is based on elements such as hazard to human life in the event of failure, economic impact, essentiality of the facility, and so on. The basic breakdown is as follows:

Occupancy Categories

Why do structural engineers need occupancy categories?

The purpose of occupancy categories is to calculate your design load, which is the maximum force a building must handle before being deemed unsafe. This is based on the combined weight of the building materials, occupants, and environmental effects such as snow, wind, rain, seismic activity, ice, etc.

What is an importance factor?

Importance factors are numeric values assigned to each occupancy category that will increase or decrease the design loads for snow, wind, rain, seismic activity, ice, etc. when multiplied by the base load. This calculation system is based on a minimum requirement in which the primary intent is to protect the life and safety of the public. Therefore, a higher hazard to human life will result in a higher design load, and a lower hazard to human life will result in a lower design load. Occupancy category II will always have an importance factor of 1.0, thus making the design load the same as the base load.

Who determines the occupancy category?

Occupancy category is determined by the authority having jurisdiction over the project. Although the engineer is not responsible for choosing the occupancy category, it is useful for them to know when calculating design loads for a structure.

How does occupancy category affect building costs?

Depending on the occupancy category, your price will fluctuate to account for the structural requirements and cost of materials. Higher occupancy categories will result in higher costs, and lower occupancy categories will result in lower costs. When researching and pricing out your building, it is important to compare “apples to apples”, and make sure the occupancy category is appropriate for the intended use of the building.

How does Rubb view occupancy categories?

Rubb Building Systems takes occupancy categories and the safety of those in our buildings very seriously. Unfortunately, others may not, capitalizing on technicalities in the wording of each occupancy category. Where does the line get drawn between “minor” and “major”, or “temporary” and “permanent”? “A responsible engineer determines the intended use and the customer needs, and uses their best judgment in determining occupancy category,” our engineer stressed. All of our engineers take the time and care to put the occupancy category on top of every cover sheet, so that our clients can see it up front and use it in correlation with other information. Our calculations are in accordance with the most current building codes, and all plans and drawings are documented and signed before sending them to our clients.

Didn’t answer your question? You can contact us by leaving a comment, e-mailing us, or messaging us on Facebook, Twitter, Linkedin, or Google+ and we’ll be happy to respond as soon as possible. You can also contact us by phone at 1-800-289-7822 or visit us at 1 Rubb Lane, Sanford, ME 04073.

Hurricane Action Steps

This is a reminder to owners of Rubb Buildings in hurricane zones.

The 2014 hurricane season is upon us, and that means taking the proper precautions to help ensure your structure’s durability through the storm. During a hurricane or tropical storm, wind forces, especially with the presence of tornadoes, can sometimes exceed building code design requirements. Although Rubb Building range products are properly designed to code and engineered to resist substantial wind loads, we stress the importance of following the safety measures outlined below so that you can help to minimize or prevent damage to your Rubb Building and preserve the structure’s integrity and longevity.

  • Close and secure all doors to the Rubb Building. This applies to large equipment or hangar doors as well as smaller personnel doors.
  • Repair any loose or damaged PVC cladding. Excessively loose areas of fabric should be tightened if possible. Tears in the PVC should be patched with a PVC Repair Kit to strengthen the area around the tear and prevent flapping in the wind, which can lead to additional tearing. Cutting a circle in the fabric at the end of the tear will help spread out the tension in the fabric and prevent the tear from spreading.
  • Check base tension of the PVC. The PVC tensioning hardware around the base of the structure should be applying even tension on the covering. Any loose tensioning hardware along the sides should be tightened. Caution: PVC cladding should be tight but over tightening will stretch the fabric and is not recommended.
  • Secure debris in the area. Although a hurricane can carry wind-borne debris for miles, you can help to minimize damage to the PVC membrane and structural frame by securing any loose items on your site that could blow into the building and cause damage.
  • Make sure structure is properly anchored. Some Rubb products, especially non-code designed shelter range products such as the THA, are often secured with ballast blocks and/or around spikes. These should all be in place and properly secured to the structure baseplates, foundation beam or base angle. Check that the proper number of anchor spikes or bolts is being used to hold down the foundation. If needed, secure the frame of the shelter to ballast to help hold it in place.

In the event of emergency please contact our President at 207-651-7821, our Chief Operating Officer at 207-651-7354, or our Site Operations Manager at 207-651-7358.