Building the scenes for a new Rubb Group video

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Our new video is set to take viewers behind the scenes at the Rubb Group to highlight the design, manufacturing and construction processes that underpin our fabric building solutions.

Creative company Studio Wallop has been busy gathering video footage and images over the summer for the new company film for the Rubb Group.

Staff and ongoing work at Rubb took centre stage when Studio Wallop spent some time on site filming the design and manufacturing processes involved in creating Rubb fabric structures.

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Studio Wallop is an independent creative studio based in Liskeard, Cornwall, specialising in film, animation, photography and design. Set up by director and designer Stephen Tolfrey, Studio Wallop has more than 24 years experience in producing work for many clients, from small independents to major international brands.

Owner/Producers Stephen and Kim Tolfrey filmed at Rubb’s design and sales offices and PVC and steel manufacturing workshops. They also visited the site where Rubb’s building frame steel work is hot dip galvanized to protect it from corrosion.

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Staff from Rubb Marketing and the film crew visited two high profile Rubb buildings in the north east of England: Newcastle United and Sunderland Association Football Clubs’ training facilities. These two sports buildings are considered to be flagship indoor football training hubs and are good examples of how Rubb building systems can help protect players from the elements, while providing an internal light and airy atmosphere thanks to our translucent roofing systems.

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From the pitch to the airfield

With filming and photography complete at Rubb and key sites in the north, Studio Wallop then set off on the long road trip to Gatwick Airport for the opening of the new Rubb aircraft hangar for easyJet at Gatwick Airport. The new top-flight, two-bay facility provides 5200sq m (58,125sq ft) of usable working floorspace and can accommodate two Airbus A321s at the same time.

The video also features other projects and highlights from throughout the Rubb Group, which has operations in the UK, USA, Norway, Sweden and Singapore.

Rubb Group CEO Rune Vamråk said: “We are very proud of our new video. Studio Wallop and the staff involved did a great job. The video allows clients to explore our commitment to excellence in engineering in everything we do, while watching the processes involved when creating our quality fabric building solutions.”

You can view the Rubb Group video here.

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Maine Innovators of Tension Fabric Structures

fabric innovationWhat do machine guns, toothpicks, and earmuffs all have in common? Seemingly nothing at first, however if you did a little digging you would find that all of these products were developed right here in Maine. And although this state has seen countless other paramount inventions, none comes close to the ingenious works of Charles William Moss and his Pop Tent which inspired and changed the world of fabric structures as we know them today.

Bill Moss was born in 1923 in Detroit, Michigan. Because of his creative nature, he chose to study art at the University of Michigan, the Layton School of Art, and the Cranbrook Academy of Art before getting a job as an artist  and illustrator for the Ford Times in 1949. A few years later in 1955, while still working for Ford, Bill Moss finished the design for his first Pop Tent model, forever altering peoples perception of camping and jumping into a future of fabric structures as a widely accepted industry. Throughout the following twenty years Moss would continue to improve his tent models, and even open his own design firm in Michigan, before moving to Maine with his wife at the time, Marylin, to found Moss Tent Works in 1975 as a retail manufacturing company. Although Moss retired from the company in 1983, leaving it in the hands of, by then ex-wife, Marylin, during his time in Maine he met and touched the lives of many, spreading his wisdom and guiding those who also wanted to dabble in the magnificence of fabric structures. Whether as a personal mentor or in spirit, his reputation brought visionaries from across Maine to the doorsteps of Moss Tent Works. One of these architectural pilgrims was Charles Duvall, who was hired at Moss Tent Works in 1984 and has been working with tensioned fabric ever since.

Charles DuvallBeginning as a camping tent designer at Moss Tent Works, Duvall was strongly influenced by plants and naturally resilient vegetation. His inspiration came from the idea that flowers, vines, weeds, and branches were all seemingly lightweight and delicate, yet strong and durable. This contradiction led Duvall to create some of the most exotic tent designs of his time, making them a world recognized commodity for their integrity, dependability, and charm. Duvall left Moss Tent Works in 1994 in order to start his own company, and in 1995 Duvall Designs was founded in Rockland, Maine. Moving in a more creative direction, Duvall Designs steps away from camping tents and focuses mainly on creative fabrications for architectural installations and exhibit spaces. His works can be seen in locations across the United States.

Cindy ThompsonAnother one of Moss’ most prominent disciples was Cindy Thompson, founder and president of Transformit, a company based out of Gorham, Maine that produces tensioned fabric sculptures. Thompson met Moss by the way of fate when he stumbled across her art at a gallery in Maine. Sharing an adoration for fabric elements in their creative work, Moss helped Thompson further her career by recommending her to Arizona State University, and upon her return to Maine in 1985, the two shared a studio together. Eventually they parted ways, and Transformit was founded in 1988. Since then the company has produced a number of prestigious exhibits, and even collaborated with Duvall Designs on a few projects.

Moss eventually moved to Arizona where he found luxury as a painter before his death in 1994 at the age of 72. But Bill Moss leaves behind an intangible legacy and tradition of fabric structures that is carried on by those who cherished and respected him. Companies like Moss Tent Works (eventually traded to REI and renamed Moss, Inc.), Duvall Designs, Transformit, and us here at Rubb, Inc. owe our thanks and appreciation to the ingenuity of the man known as the father of tension fabric – Charles William Moss.

The Benefits of Hot-Dip Galvanization Answered by Rubb

If you are in the market for a steel framed building, careful thought should be given to the construction materials, and ultimately, on the manufacturing process of the structures’ framework to ensure its quality and longevity. You could have the steel painted; although the paint is prone to chipping, which can result in rust damage. You could have the steel pre-galvanized; although the welding process strips off the zinc, making the weld point susceptible to rust . Or you could have the steel hot-dip galvanized, a technique used in the post-production of all Rubb Buildings. But before deciding on a process, it is important to understand what exactly galvanization entails.

Galvanization is the process of applying a protective zinc coating to steel or iron to prevent rusting. The most common method used today is hot-dip galvanization, in which the steel or iron is submerged in a tank of hot zinc in its fabricated shape to ensure the entire structure gets coated, and therefore, is completely protected from rust and erosion. And you might not think so, but hot-dip galvanization is much more intricate than simply giving the steel a zinc bath.

Before being submerged, the steel must undergo a caustic cleaning. This involves soaking it in a hot alkali solution to remove any contaminants such as oil or grease built up during production. Then the pieces are subjected to pickling, a cycle in which the steel is immersed in an acid solution to remove surface scale and any existing rust. Finally, before getting dipped in zinc, the steel must be put through the fluxing process. The flux is a substance used to r
emove
 oxides from and prevent further oxidation of fused metals, and in the case of hot-dip galvanization, zinc ammonium chloride is used. Because the density of the flux is less than that of the zinc, it floats on the surface, allowing for fluxing and coating to be done simultaneously.

Now that you know hot-dip galvanization is, I’m sure the next question on your mind is “How much does it cost?
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Although every structure will have a unique cost depending on the size, shape, and other project specs, you really want to be thinking about how long you want your building to last. Post production hot-dip galvanizing to the framework offers corrosion protection that is far superior to other construction types, minimizing maintenance costs and ensuring long term structural integrity. And that’s the key – long term savings. A case study showed that if the Golden Gate Bridge had been hot-dip galvanized, the potential savings would be around $319 million. That’s enough to build the entire bridge several times over!

So if you are in the market for a steel framed building, you have to decide; do you want a structure that is going to rust, or do you want it hot-dip galvanized?