A Day of Firsts for Women in Aviation

Be it commercial flight, space aeronautics, or military piloting, here at Rubb, Inc. we are very interested in anything under the umbrella of aviation. Rubb has supplied aircraft hangars, air cargo facilities and ground support buildings, including airport terminals, to numerous airlines, airports, military organizations, and even NASA for over thirty years. And although our buildings are as dependable, if not more, than they were thirty years ago, there have been many milestones in the world of aerial navigation since the turn of the twentieth century. Two of the most significant of those milestones occurred on June 18th in the years 1928 and 1983, and they were pioneered by two of the most influential American women to date.

Amelia_EarhartAmelia Earhart, born on July 24th, 1897, was a natural adventurer and tomboy, making her the perfect candidate for piloting. After a ten-minute passenger flight in 1920, Earhart knew that she belonged in the air, and spent the following year saving up for flight lessons. On May 23rd, 1923, Earhart became the 16th woman in history to be issued a pilots licence, and after five years of activity in the aviation community she finally had the opportunity to put her ability to the test. On June 18th, 1928, Earhart successfully landed in South Wales, England after a 20 hour and 40 minute flight across the Atlantic from Newfoundland, Canada. That day would forever be known by the first transatlantic solo flight piloted by a woman. Earhart continued to make aviation history through other solo transoceanic flights as well as in long-distance air racing competitions until her disappearance in 1937 during an attempt to fly across the world. Her reputation and fame, however, proceeds her, as she is known today as one of the most remembered and accomplished pilots in history.

Sally RideSally Ride was born on May 26th, 1951, and like Earhart, was very passionate in everything she did. So after receiving a bachelor’s degree in English and Physics, followed by her master’s degree and Ph.D. in Physics from Stanford University, she was an obvious candidate for the NASA space program which she joined in 1978. After five years of aeronautic development, ground communication, and astronaut training, she was ready for her first flight into space. On June 18th, 1983, Ride became the first American woman in space aboard the space shuttle Challenger, and would spend over 300 hours in space during the rest of her NASA career. Ride later retired from NASA and carried out the rest of her life teaching, writing, and encouraging science in education. She died of pancreatic cancer in 2012 at age 61. Ride is one of the most esteemed astronauts of our time, whose legacy lives on through her achievements in aviation.

June 18th has become a day to remember for aviation lovers across the world. So in honor of Earhart and Ride and all of their accomplishments, Rubb would like to say thank you to all of the aviation pioneers out there. And in the words of Earhart herself, “The most effective way to do it is to do it.”

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